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JavaScript The Definitive Guide 6th Edition-David Flanagan
JavaScript The Definitive Guide 6th Edition  Review
by David Flanagan (Author)
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Publisher : Oreilly
Publish date : 12-May-2011
Category : Computer Books New Arrival
Mediatype : Books
Binding : Paperback
Availability : IsAvailable, Order now ships within 5-7 business days
List Price :   Rs. 1200
Greenleaf Price :  Rs. 1200
You Save :  Rs. 0
ISBN : 9780596805524 / Indian ISBN 13: 9789350233948
Pages : 1120
Book Summary : JavaScript The Definitive Guide 6th Edition

Whether you need an example-driven programmer's guide or a complete desk reference, JavaScript: The Definitive Guide is the most authoritative book on the language that runs the Web. The sixth edition offers comprehensive coverage of ECMAScript 5 (the new language standard) and also the new APIs introduced in HTML5. The chapters on functions and classes have been completely rewritten and updated to match current best practices. A new chapter covers language extensions and subsets.

JavaScript: The Definitive Guide is organized into four sections:

  • Part 1: Learn the core JavaScript language in detail -- ideal for newcomers as well as experienced JavaScript programmers who want to sharpen their skills
  • Part 2: Understand the scripting environment provided by web browsers with broad and deep coverage of client-side JavaScript illustrated by many sophisticated examples
  • Part 3: Get a complete reference for core JavaScript that documents every class, object, constructor, method, function, property, and constant
  • Part 4: Consult a separate reference to client-side JavaScript, including legacy web browser APIs, the standard Level 2 DOM API, the XMLHttpRequest object, and the canvas tag

The 6th edition of JavaScript: The Definitive Guide includes 125 examples that you can view and download from from examples.oreilly.com/9780596805531/ or from github.com/davidflanagan/javascript6_examples
These are ten of my favorites from the book. Note that many of these use new features of ES5 or of HTML5, and will only work in the newest browsers:

  1. Example 1-1 is is an extended example in the first chapter of the book, intended to show readers a simple but non-trivial example of JavaScript. This is the loan calculator example from the last edition, but made much more interesting with the addition of client-side graphics, localStorage, and Ajax.
  2. Example 9-7 emulates Java-style enumerated types in JavaScript. It demonstrates that JavaScript's prototype-based inheritance is so flexible that factory methods can be normal object factories or even class factories. That example is a little clearer if you look at the code in Example 9-8.
  3. Example 9-16 defines a class hierarchy of abstract and concrete Set classes. This one is a favorite because it involves data types and API design. Chapter 9 includes a number of other Set examples, too.
  4. Example 9-23 demonstrates the ES5 Object.defineProperty() method and defines a convenient way to inspect and modify the attributes of the properties of an object. It may not be practical, but I think it is a beautiful hack.
  5. Example 15-10 is a simple stream-like API wrapped around the innerHTML property of an element. When you're generating text (a table, for example) for display it is sometimes easier to pass each chunk that you compute to a write() method than it is to concatenate it all together and set it on innerHTML.
  6. Example 21-03 is an analog clock implemented as an SVG graphic with scriptable hands. I love client-side graphics, and this is a favorite of mine because making the hands rotate is so simple with SVG transforms.
  7. Example 21-06 draws a fractal Koch snowflake using the <canvas> tag. I like it because it draws the same line over and over again, but uses transformations to make the line appear at different locations, orientations and sizes.
  8. Example 21-13 is another graphical example: it draws sparklines (edwardtufte.com/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=0001OR). This one is a favorite just because sparklines are so cool.
  9. Example 22-1 uses the HTML5 geolocation API to find out where you are then uses the Google Maps API to obtain a static map of your location. I like it because geolocation (via wifi networks) is just pure magic!
  10. Example 22-15 is a long example that demonstrates the IndexedDB API. I like it because the idea of a client-side database in a web browser is crazy and cool. This one is really cutting-edge, but if you're running Firefox 4, you can try it out here: davidflanagan.com/demos/zipcodes.html

About the Author
David Flanagan is a programmer and writer with a website at http://davidflanagan.com. His other O'Reilly books include JavaScript Pocket Reference, The Ruby Programming Language, and Java in a Nutshell. David has a degree in computer science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He lives with his wife and children in the Pacific Northwest between the cities of Seattle, Washington, and Vancouver, British Columbia.

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